Review: Coming Home to Your True Self by Albert Haase

Coming Home to Your True Self: Leaving the Emptiness of False Attractions by Albert Haase

Not too bad of a book. I wasn’t real impressed at first, but he does a good job of discussing the true and false self. Fairly easy to read.¬†Perhaps the best part of the book was the last chapter which had to do with growing spiritually.

He does a pretty good job of breaking down the characteristics of the true and false self which is helpful. The book is very accessible, more so that Thomas Merton or others. Perhaps this is because he is a spiritual director and he is writing the book to people who simply want to grow in their faith.

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Culture Making: Recovering Our Creative Calling

Culture Making: Recovering Our Creative Calling Culture Making: Recovering Our Creative Calling by Andy Crouch

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
There are some books that after you turn the last page, you know you will be different. You can’t always explain why, but in the course of reading it, you know something deep within you has been changed. This book has had that effect on me.

I only read it because Amazon suggested it, and it did go along with some of my dissertation research. A couple of times, in the beginning, I thought about reading something else instead, but I continued on and I’m glad I did.

Crouch discusses “cultures” and how Christians interact with the cultures around them. Instead of calling Christians have postures of being against culture, critiquing culture, consuming culture, or transformation culture, he calls them to create culture (which according to Crouch is what God calls us to do).

For me, the best part of the book was Part 3 where he eloquently invites all to be culture makers for the sake of the Gospel.

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Introduction To The Missional Church by Alan Roxburgh

Introducing the Missional Church: What It Is, Why It Matters, How to Become One by Alan J. Roxburgh

My rating: 5 of 5 stars
This is probably the best book I’ve read introducing the missional church. Roxburgh does an excellent job describing what missional ministry is, and what it isn’t.

The one critique I do have is the time he spent describing the process he takes churches through (I’m guessing in a consulting role). I wished he would have given some more direction for local pastors in cultivating “missional imagination” within their congregations. Perhaps he does this in his book “Missional Map-making” which I have not read yet.

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